Email: pingalwara57@gmail.com Phone: +91-183-2584713, +91-183-2584586
Select a page

ARTICLES

1. Blueprint for Survival of Divine Himalaya -I

Sunder Lal Bahuguna

Abstract

Himalaya will play an important role in shaping the future of Asia. Development, with only economic growth and achievement of affluence, has made man the butcher of nature. To achieve the goal of real development, our behaviour with Nature should be as a child’s with the Mother. We have to fulfill our needs from Nature. For this, the use of Science and technology should be to sublimate Nature. This is what the ‘chipko’ movement is all about………

 Full Article

2. Blueprint for Survival of Divine Himalaya –II

Sunder Lal Bahuguna

Abstract

More and more people have been affected on account of disaster in Himalaya in the shape of floods, soil-erosion and drought. We in Himalaya are facing the Crisis of Survival due to suicidal activities being carried out in the name of development. These are commercial exploitation of the forests, mining, haphazard construction of dams, which inundate vast areas and displace a large number of people, mechanical heavy explosions creating artificial tremors, construction of Five Star Hotels for luxury tourism and multi-storeyed buildings not in tune with Himalayan landscape. . Resources should be used for regional economic self-sufficiency. Ban on indiscriminate exploitation and export of resources (e.g. mining, deforestation, and construction of big dams etc)…………

 Full Article

3. Death of a Planet

Satyapal Anand

Abstract

There looms ahead the problem of the very survival of mankind which requires a far greater concentration and application of cerebral activity and statesmanlike wisdom than has marked the past or is evident in the world today. The exponential growth of population is only one interacting component of our global system. If all the world’s have nots became haves overnight, the rates of consumption of raw materials would be about three times the present rates. The inevitable byproduct of increasing agricultural urban and industrial development to meet the needs and want of an expanding world population is pollution through solid, liquid and gaseous waste products. However, it is possible to avoid a catastrophic fate for mankind.

Full Article

4. The Suicide Economy of Corporate Globalisation

Dr. Vandana Shiva

Abstract

The Indian peasantry, the largest body of surviving small farmers in the world, today faces a crisis of extinction. The shift from farm saved seed to corporate monopolies of the seed supply is also a shift from biodiversity to monocultures in agriculture. Monocultures and uniformity increase the risks of crop failure as diverse seeds adapted to diverse ecosystems are replaced by rushed introduction of unadapted and often untested seeds into the market.

Full Article

5. Humans- Biggest Threat to Environment

Abstract

Today the planet holds more then six billion people. During the next century, the world double, with 90% of that growth occurring in poorer, developing countries. India, one of the first countries to adopt a family planning programme, some 30 years ago, failed to forge a national will for the task and the population is now growing at 2% a year. Scientist and environmentalist has noted that of all entrenched values, religion presented perhaps the greatest obstacle to population control.

Full Article

6. Forcing Rapid Climate Change

‘GRIM SCENARIO FOR EARTH’

Abstract

Natural greenhouse effect (GHE) already keeps the earth warm enough for habitation, but emissions from human activities have substantially increased concentrations of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and CFCs. According to the report, stabilising atmospheric concentrations of carbon-dioxide at present day levels would require emission reduction. of over 60 per cent; and methane reductions would have to be 1 5 to 20 per cent. The oceans are reckoned to send out and absorb similar amounts. Man’s activities emit 5,700 million tons to the atmosphere through burning fossil fuels (coal and oil), and possibly more than 2,000 million tons through land use changes, mainly through loss of tropical forests.

Full Article

7. Disturbing Developments

By R. K. Behl

Abstract

The major emphasis is on meeting the basic needs of all and making possible a life of dignity. This requires such development strategies as anticipate environmental problems. Eco-development by respecting natural laws and processes needs to be encouraged. In order to resolve the population environment conflicts, a major shift in our attitudes and development priorities is a must.

Full Article

8. Agriculture: what’s wrong?

by Birinder Pal Singh

Abstract

IT is unfortunate that the “land of five rivers” is fast proceeding towards the brink of prosperity and depleting its water resources. It seems history has destined it that way. Two rivers were lost during Partition and the remaining are given to pollution and natural upheavals of more or less availability of water. No doubt, science and technology have done wonders for agriculture but can we sustain it without nature. Biotechnology has only started showing symptoms of still greater marvels in this field, but how long we shall be able to play with the proposed restructuring of nature that is being done not primarily in the interest of the farmers and their welfare, but essentially for MNCs like Monsanto.

Full Article